“The Coehorn mortars were employed wherever circumstances would permit”: Mortars at Spotsylvania

When the Army of the Potomac broke winter quarters in early May 1864, the Artillery Reserve brought along a somewhat novel weapon – 24-pdr Coehorn mortars. Eight of these mortars, with 100 shells each, traveled with the reserve park, manned by Company E, 15th New York Heavy Artillery.  Of their performance and utilization, Brigadier-General HenryContinue reading ““The Coehorn mortars were employed wherever circumstances would permit”: Mortars at Spotsylvania”

Abbot to Hunt: “Every step has been taken to hurry forward…”

In April 1864, Brigadier-General Henry Hunt sent recommendations and instructions to form a siege train supporting the Army of the Potomac’s next campaign.  On the first day of May 1864, Colonel Henry Abbot sent an update on his preparations toward that end: Fort Richardson, VA., May 1, 1864. Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, Chief ofContinue reading “Abbot to Hunt: “Every step has been taken to hurry forward…””

“with considerable annoyance to the garrison”: Fifth “minor” bombardment of Fort Sumter

On April 28, 1864, Federals on the northern end of Morris Island opened another concentrated bombardment of Fort Sumter.  This bombardment lasted for a week.  And if you are counting, according to Captain John Johnson this was the fifth minor bombardment of Fort Sumter by the Federal batteries.  This fifth minor bombardment consisted primarily ofContinue reading ““with considerable annoyance to the garrison”: Fifth “minor” bombardment of Fort Sumter”