A threat to the Rapidan Fords

Over the last five years a new threat to the Culpeper County battlefields emerged. While there are similarities to earlier threats to preservation, it’s the place names that some readers may find new in the discussion. Preservationists have long heard the names Brandy Station, Cedar Mountain, and, mostly in the last decade, Hansbrough Ridge, in relation to efforts to preserve and protect the Civil War battlefields. Morton’s Ford is another we see mention on occasion. And with Morton’s we must also mention several other adjacent fords on the Rapidan River. The most important of those is Raccoon Ford. In addition to pressing across the Rapidan at Morton’s Ford, Federals also demonstrated at Raccoon Ford on February 6-7, 1864. And for that reason, Raccoon Ford is included within the “Core Battlefield Area” and the potential area for “National Registry Boundary” of the battlefield, as defined by the American Battlefield Protection Program (ABPP):

That in yellow is the potential National Registry Boundary, matching to the battlefield study area, more or less. It’s the area enclosed within red that we need to focus upon here – that’s the defined Battlefield Core Area. As in, “this is where fighting took place”… a key distinction of note, as many will try to “tell” us where a battle was or was not fought. This is the “official” designation of the battlefield, the product of accurate and detailed study. Morton’s Ford is within the “bulge” to the right. Raccoon Ford is on the left, covering both banks of the Rapidan… because its a FORD. The designation as “core area” is sound. If one wishes to dispute that, then evidence is required…. lots and lots of evidence… and that cannot be prefaced with “I think….”

Now beyond just the established fact that Raccoon Ford is within a core battlefield, we can go on to mention how often that site was used during the Civil War by the belligerents as they maneuvered through central Virginia. Every major campaign from 1862 on to 1864 passed by or through Raccoon Ford. One runs out of fingers and toes counting the number of skirmishes or other actions that took place there. If one wishes to tally the generals who crossed there, it would look like a “Who’s Who” of the Civil War. And we might go on to mention the significance this ford played in other chapters of American history – Colonial, Revolutionary, and right up to the present.

Again, more “established” facts that point to the historical pedigree of this site. There’s no way one can dispute or deny Raccoon Ford has a place in the history books.

But… as happens all too often in the discussion of historical sites… there are those who discount those facts and thus devalue our history. Raccoon Ford is now at the center of a planned solar farm development project. The project has not yet been approved, but has been the subject of long running discussions. Consider this map drawn to indicate the areas considered for solar farm development:

Highlighted in blue hashes and outlined in light blue is the “Core Battlefield Area. The actual “Raccoon Ford Area of Historic Interest” is in purple hashed highlight. And the designated “Battlefield Study Area” is in light green. It is the areas outlined in red that we preservationists need to be concerned about. That is the area on where the solar facilities would go. Not only would the area be dominated by solar panels, facilities, buildings, and power lines, but the ACTUAL battlefield itself would be covered.

There are certainly dozens of other considerations to think about here – environmental being perhaps the one that should weigh even more than the historical aspects. However, this is “to the Sound of the Guns” blog, and not the “Engineering Disasters Where People Build in a Flood Plain” blog…. so we shall focus on the history here.

What happens to a battlefield when it is covered with solar panels? This:

Averasboro 1A 112

This is just outside Godwin, North Carolina, and within the study area for the Averasboro battlefield. Students of Sherman’s March know that battle well. It is upon these fields that Hardee’s command delayed the Federal Left Wing to set up the battle of Bentonville. Was “that” battle fought right there? I can make the case that skirmishing occurred there. Depending on the “jury,” I believe a good lawyer could make that case. At a minimum, the ABPP indicated there were tactical troop movements here worthy of study.

And study? Yes. You will hear me often contend that the land – the actual physical ground itself – is a primary source for historians studying a battlefield. Quite often it is our only tangible link between the present and the past, from which we can properly understand the accounts and recollections of those who fought.

Up until the last decade, here’s what that field looked like:

BeforeSolar

To the uninitiated, this is but your standard North Carolina farm field. But to a trained eye, there are nuances in the ground that need be considered and examined. (A lesson that struck home for me many years ago when studying the Belmont battlefield, where a slight rise of less than a foot – inches, mind you – indicated the location of a “ridge” which commanders mentioned and veterans later recalled. Inches high, it was just slightly above the wet, muddy bottom lands, and worth fighting over that day in November 1861.) Sadly, historians will no longer be able to study those nuances. Today history is blockaded by a locked gate:

Averasboro 1A 111

Raccoon Ford should not suffer this fate.

Later this month, the Culpeper County Board of Supervisors will renew discussion on this solar farm proposal. Local citizens have already brought up their concerns and expressed opposition. And YOU can help by signing their petition to stop this development. I ask you to consider signing that petition, helping those who are at the front line of this preservation battle.

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