Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 1st New York Light Artillery

We turn now to the New York listings in the third quarter summary.  Appropriately, the clerks allocated a complete page to document all of the batteries and sections from the state:

0273_1_Snip_NY_All

That’s enough New York Yankees to fill the major league team and the farm system!  The First, Second (one battery), and Third regiments of artillery are there.  Along with lines for thirty-three independent batteries, though not all in service at the time.  Rounding out the page are five entries for sections from cavalry and infantry regiments (unfortunately split up within the page).  A lot to discuss.  We’ll break these down by section and start with Colonel Charles S. Wainwright’s 1st New York Light Artillery Regiment:

0273_1_Snip_NY1

Compared to our Missouri postings, the 1st New York offers a relatively clean set of returns without need of much speculation.  Be that due to Wainwright’s attention to administration… or the proximity to Washington.  Let’s cover the locations, cannon reported, commanders, and command assignments:

  • Battery A: At Pottsville, Pennsylvania, on an April 1864 receipt date, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Battery A, under Captain Thomas H. Bates, transferred to the Department of the Sesquehanna in early June 1863, specifically the District of Philadelphia.  They pulled the “arduous” duty of guarding Pottsville and the vital Yuengling Brewery… right….
  • Battery B: At Culpeper, Virginia with four 10-pdr Parrotts. Recall Lieutenant Robert E. Rogers brought this battery off the field at Gettysburg, after more senior officers fell.  At that time the battery supported Second Corps.  After Gettysburg, the battery moved to the 2nd Volunteer Brigade, Reserve Artillery, Army of the Potomac.  Lieutenant Albert S. Sheldon, recovering from his Gettysburg wound, was promoted to command the battery. Later in December, Rogers would replace Sheldon permanently.
  • Battery C: Listed at Three Mile Station, Virginia (three miles from Warrenton Junction, at a village named Casanova today) with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Almont Barnes remained in command and the battery remained with Fifth Corps.
  • Battery D: Reporting from Brandy Station, Virginia with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Supporting Third Corps, Captain George B. Winslow remained in command.
  • Battery E: “Not in the service.”   Reduced by sickness and other causes during the Peninsula Campaign, members of this battery were then serving with Battery L, below.  Lieutenant William Rumsey is the ranking officer I know of, from this period, in the battery.
  • Battery F: At Camp Barry, Washington, D.C. with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain William R. Wilson remained in command.  The battery, assigned to the Artillery Camp of Instruction, was in the Twenty-second Corps.
  • Battery G: Now at Mitchell’s Station, Virginia, in Culpeper County, with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Nelson Ames’s battery transferred out of the 4th Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve in August, returning to the 2nd Corps.
  • Battery H: Also at Camp Barry with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles E. Mink remained in command.  At the end of September, the battery transferred to First Corps, Army of the Potomac.
  • Battery I: No report. Captain Michael Wiedrich commanded this battery, assigned to Eleventh Corps.  The battery had six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles at this time of the war.  The battery was sent west, with the rest of Eleventh Corps, to reinforce Chattanooga, with movement starting in late September.
  • Battery K: Reporting at Brandy Station, Virginia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. The battery remained with the battery assigned to Third Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve.  The 11th New York Independent Battery was attached to Battery K at this time, and manned two of the guns.  In August, Captain Robert H. Fitzhugh was promoted to Major.  In his place Lieutenant Edward L. Bailey led the battery.
  • Battery L: Simply “in the field” with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Listed on the order of battle as a combined Batteries E & L, Captain Gilbert H. Reynolds commanded.  The battery supported First Corps and was in Culpeper County at the end of the reporting period.
  • Battery M: Reporting from Bridgeport, Alabama, in January 1864, with four 10-pdr Parrott rifles.  Lieutenant Charles Winegar commanded this battery, supporting Twelfth Corps.  The battery started movement in late September with its parent formation on the long journey to reinforce Chattanooga.  So while the location as of the end of September was Virginia, within a few weeks they were transiting through Bridgeport as they played a part in the relief of the Army of the Cumberland.

For perhaps the brief moment of a single quarter within the war, all of the 1st New York Light Artillery was operating in the same theater.  When Battery H transferred to the First Corps, only Battery A (in Pennsylvania) and Battery F (in D.C.) were outside the Army of the Potomac.  However, with the departure of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps for Chattanooga in the last days of September, that arrangement changed.

Moving to the ammunition pages, we start with the smoothbore rounds reported on hand:

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Three batteries reporting, all with Napoleons:

  • Battery A: 192 shot, 64 shell, 320 case, and 136 canister.
  • Battery D: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister.
  • Battery G: 262 shot, 100 shell, 262 case, and 144 canister.

And as for the Hotchkiss projectiles:

0275_2_Snip_NY1
All for those Ordnance rifle batteries:

  • Battery C: 92 canister, 140 percussion shell, 146 fuse shell, and 456 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery F: 123 canister, 56 percussion shell, 160 fuse shell, and 480(?) bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery H: 180 canister, 130 percussion shell, and 160 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K: 120 canister and 362 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery L: 120 canister and 39 percussion shell for 3-inch rifles.

We can trim the next page down to look just at Parrott rounds:

0276_1P_Snip_NY1

Two of those Parrott batteries:

  • Battery B: 354 shell, 297 case, and 95 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery M: 298 shell, 412 case, and 94 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

The rifled-gun batteries also reported Schenkl rounds on hand:

0276_2_Snip_NY1

Four reporting:

  • Battery B: 57 shell for 10-pdr Parrott.
  • Battery H: 293 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery K: 353 shell and 555 case for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery L: 441 shell and 600 case for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly the small arms:

0276_3_Snip_NY1

A little fuzzy, but we can work with these:

  • Battery A: Seventeen Navy revolvers.
  • Battery B: Nine Army revolvers and thirteen cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C: One Army revolver, eight Navy revolvers, and twenty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery D: Eight Army revolvers and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F: Eighteen Army revolvers, six horse artillery sabers, and sixteen foot artillery swords.
  • Battery G: Nineteen Army revolvers and twenty-seven horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty Navy revolvers, fifteen cavalry sabers, and five horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Nine Army revolvers and thirty cavalry sabers.
  • Battery L: Sixteen Navy revolvers and nine horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Eight Army revolvers and two horse artillery sabers.

Once again, we see a very good set of returns for the 1st New York Light Artillery.  Where there are empty entry lines, other (official) records fill in many of the open questions.

 

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