Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Mississippi… Marine Brigade and possibly other

In the previous quarter we looked at entries for the Mississippi Marine Brigade – a unit that was NOT from Mississippi; was NOT constituted of marines; and was NOT a brigade.   We have two lines that are clearly covering the Mississippi Marine Brigade for the third quarter.  But another which is rather ambiguous:

0265_1_Snip_MMB

As the first two lines are clearly for the Mississippi Marine Brigade, let’s get those out of the way:

  • U.S. Steamer Autocrat: Six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.
  • U.S. Steamer Diana: Two 12-pdr “heavy” field guns.

The first line matches, in quantity of guns, to Captain Daniel Walling’s battery.  And recall the brigade reported two 12-pdr heavy field guns on the Diana during the previous quarter.  Missing here are two 12-pdr Napoleons reported the previous quarter. And 12-pdr howitzers that were known to be with the brigade but not on the previous quarter report.  I would suggest the Napoleons and field howitzers were actually “loaned” to the brigade, and were returned in June or July.

After the fall of Vicksburg the Mississippi Marine Brigade continued to operate in that area.  Among the important missions of the brigade, an expedition to Port Gibson rounded up Confederate civilians to be held in custody as leverage against a group of Northern school teachers held by Confederates.  On September 9, the mounted portion of the brigade captured a Confederate paymaster with a sizable amount of money.  But for the most part, the brigade was charged with protecting contrabands (Goodrich’s Landing among those) and plantations in northeastern Louisiana…. and getting into trouble.

I posted a drawing showing the Diana for the last quarter.  So here’s a drawing of the Autocrat, which was Colonel Charles Ellet, Jr.’s flagship.

US_Steamer_Autocrat

So for the Mississippi Marine Brigade, we have names and even pictures.  Just a couple of questions about other cannon reported with the unit but not indicated on the summary.

But this leaves us with that third line to consider.  And it deserves a close look:

0265_1A_Snip_MMB

Clear is the date of receipt in Washington: May 16, 1864.  Though as we’ve discussed with many of these returns and summaries, there’s a grain of salt that need be applied.

Also clear is the location reporting from:  Natchez, Mississippi.

What’s in between can go a lot of ways.  This could be “Col.” as in colonel, and then refer to another element of the Mississippi Marine Brigade.  Arguing against that, while the brigade was “around” and elements would pass through Natchez during the summer, none were actually assigned to Natchez.  Least not artillery.  Furthermore, I cannot shoe-horn any transcription of the cursive scrawl that is a credible interpretation.   And there is something erased at the end of that cell in the form which is unclear.  I would contend this is not an element of the Mississippi Marine Brigade.

I hate to go to the same well again, but this line could also represent colored troops being organized at that time in Mississippi.  If that is the case, then the cursive might be “Col. 2d Heavy Artillery.”  According to Dyer’s Compendium, the 1st and 2nd Regiments of Mississippi Heavy Artillery, African Descent, formed in September 1863.  The first was assigned to the Vicksburg garrison.  And the 2nd Regiment was at Natchez.   These regiments became the 5th and 6th U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, respectively.  Certainly the 2nd Mississippi Heavy Artillery would be a candidate here.  The regiment appears on department returns at Nachez, under Colonel Bernard G. Farrer, at the end of December 1863.

Regardless of exactly what the unit this line represented, the discussion is a moot point.  No equipment of any type or class is reported against that line.

That speculation left aside, we turn to the ammunition reported.  Those guys who weren’t from Mississippi and were not Marines needed some rounds for their 12-pdr guns:

0267_1_Snip_MMB

  • Steamer Diana: 58 shot, 88 shell, 154 case, and 88 canister for 12-pdr field guns.

And also some rounds for Walling’s Ordnance Rifles:

0267_2_Snip_MMB

  • Steamer Autocrat: 574 canister, 125 percussion shell, and 74 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.

Lots of canister.  Might we speculate that being aboard ship, the call was for close quarter work?  Or, perhaps that’s all the Army would trust to the Mississippi Marine Brigade.

No Parrott or James projectiles. So we move to the Schenkl page of rifled rounds:

0268_2_Snip_MMB

  • Steamer Autocrat: 2,060 case for 3-inch rifles.

I would throw a small flag of caution out here.  The column header originally read “canister”.  But as with all for this quarter’s returns, that declaration is struck through and “case” written in.  So was this 2,060 more canister rounds… with the clerks just using the old column header?  Or was this 2,060 case rounds for six 3-inch rifles?  Either way, that’s a lot of ammunition on the Autocrat.

We move last to the small arms:

0268_3_Snip_MMB

Just one line to consider:

  • Steamer Autocrat: Twenty Navy revolvers and twenty horse artillery sabers.

If my speculations are correct, the clerks at the Ordnance Department placed two very different organizations under the heading of “Mississippi.”  One was an unconventional (in source, role, and service history) unit which would be disbanded the following year.  The other appears to be a force recruited, under the authority of the Emancipation Proclamation, from former slaves and given the task of defending river ports on the Mississippi.

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Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – Missouri Miscellaneous Mix-up

Having looked at the First and Second Missouri Volunteer Artillery regiments, we find nine lines at the bottom of the state’s section on the summary for the third quarter.  For most states, the “other” area, if there at all, is simply a short list of independent batteries and perhaps some artillery-equipped sections manned by cavalry or infantry.  But with Missouri, there are militia units on active service that must also be accounted for.  So let’s consider those nine lines:

0265_1_Snip_MO3

Let us first establish the “names” assigned to those nine lines:

  • 1st Battery Artillery.  This is most likely a Missouri State Militia battery.
  • 2nd Battery Artillery. This is most likely a Missouri State Militia battery.
  • Lovejoy’s Battery.  A section with the 2nd Missouri Cavalry.
  • Colonel, 3rd Colored Infantry?  Or is this the 3rd Volunteer Infantry? We will try to sort this out below.
  • 5th Missouri State Militia (M.S.M.) Cavalry.
  • 1st Battery Missouri State Militia: Appears to be a duplicate… we will sort out below.
  • Company G, 5th Cavalry.  But hold on… this isn’t the 5th Volunteer Cavalry, but I’ll save that explanation for the moment.
  • Company G, 6th Cavalry.
  • Company A, 10th Cavalry.

So these nine lines break down into four categories – militia; sections from the militia cavalry; sections from the volunteer cavalry; and sections with the infantry.  (Though I might argue for Lovejoy’s as an “independent” battery.. it was dependent upon its parent organization for the most part.)

So looking at lines 47, 48, and 52, we have some reconciliations to work.  The Missouri State Adjutant-General’s report of 1862 identified two Missouri State Militia batteries then in service.  The 1st was under Captain Horace B. Johnson.  The 2nd was under Captain Albert Waschman (See note below).  Johnson’s battery was armed with Woodruff guns, and is of some interest for that alone.   This battery was closely associated with the 1st Cavalry, Missouri State Militia.  By December 1862, Johnson was formally in command of Company L of that regiment, and it appears his “battery” was incorporated in that company.  At any rate, by the third quarter of 1863 the battery was not in existence… or at least was not in Federal service.

With Johnson’s being redesignated, or subsumed, as cavalry, the state changed Waschman’s to the 1st Battery.  In May 1863, Waschman was demoted to lieutenant and Captain Charles H. Thurber took command of the battery.  That battery was employed in sections, with one at Sedalia and the other at Westport.  Thus I believe we can interpret the three militia battery (47, 48, and 52) entries as such:

  • 1st Battery Artillery was First Section, 1st Battery Light Artillery, Missouri State Militia (or simply 1st Battery M.S.M.):  Reporting at Sedalia, Missouri with two 12-pdr mountain howitzers and four 10-pdr Parrotts.  Thurber was in command of this section.
  • 2nd Battery Artillery:  This was an obsolete line, left in because the clerks were confused (who wouldn’t be?) with the changes regarding Missouri State Militia.
  • 1st Battery Missouri State Militia: Line 52 indicates duty at Westport, which matches with the Second Section, under Waschman.  No guns listed. But we’ll see ammunition reported later.

With respect to those “Parrott” rifles, if you look to the comments from last quarter’s post, there is a good thread identifying these as 2.9-inch English Rifles.  Specifically Robert F. Mushet’s steel rifles, cast in Whales and bored out in London to an “off the books” purchase in October 1861.

And, as alluded to in two earlier posts, Thurber’s Battery would soon be pulled into the 2nd Missouri Artillery Regiment reorganization as Battery L.

Staying within the militia formations, we have line 51 with “5th M.S.M. Cav.”  This regiment was originally the 13th M.S.M. Cavalry, redesignated to the 5th in February 1863 (when we are talking about Missouri units, you can’t tell the players without a program).  The regiment had companies stationed around south-central Missouri at Rolla, Houston, Salem, and Waynesville.  And the regiment was rather active chasing irregulars and law-breakers.  We saw an entry, without cannon, for the regiment in the previous quarter.  So let’s see what they have in the third quarter:

  • 5th M.S.M. Cavalry: At Waynesville, with two 12-pdr mountain howitzers. The regimental headquarters was at Waynesville for some time before moving to Rolla in April.  However, companies A, E, and H, under Major Waldemar Fischer remained at Waynesville.  And going to the returns, we can pinpoint the officer in charge of these particular guns – Lieutenant John Sanger, of Company A.  He was detailed to the section of howitzers starting in March, and remained with them until at least June 1864.  At that time, he was ordered to take the howitzers (minus the men) to St. Louis.  Sanger turned over the mountain howitzers and equipment to Colonel Nelson Cole, 2nd Missouri Artillery. So we’ll know where those cannon are going.  I am going to track this as “Company A, 5th M.S.M. Cavalry“, however, for reasons that will appear below.

Lines 49, 53, 54, and 55 all represent sections in volunteer cavalry regiments.  Two of these carry over from the previous quarter.

  • Lovejoy’s Battery/2nd Missouri Cavalry: Reporting at Brownsville, Arkansas with two 12-pdr mountain howitzers.  Lieutenant George Lovejoy “commanded the regimental battery” of the 2nd Missouri Cavalry starting in June 1863, according to returns.  Colonel Lewis Merrill commanded the regiment. But while Merrill served as commander of First Brigade, First Cavalry Division, District of Southeast Missouri (later transferred to the Department of Arkansas), Major Garrison Harker led the regiment.  The regiment, and battery, saw action on the advance to Little Rock in August and September 1863.  And their location given is valid for the end of that month.
  • Company G, 5th Missouri Cavalry: Reporting at Houston, Texas County, Missouri (rather specific), with two 12-pdr mountain howitzers.  Well, let’s hold off on that identification.  The 5th Missouri consolidated with the 4th Missouri Cavalry in November 1862.  And as far as I can tell, the 5th was never posted around Houston.  BUT…. recall the 5th M.S.M. Cavalry (above) indeed had detachments at Houston. And through the fall of 1863, Company G of the 5th M.S.M. was posted at that town.  Captain Thomas Thomas commanded the company.  I don’t know who, specifically, managed the howitzers.  But we will track this as Company G, 5th M.S.M. Cavalry.
  • Company G, 6th Missouri Cavalry: Reporting at Carrollton, Louisiana with four 12-pdr mountain howitzers.  After Vicksburg, the 6th Missouri Cavalry remained with Thirteenth Corps as it transferred to the Department of the Gulf.  The regiment was active on several expeditions in lower Louisiana.  But I cannot specifically place it at Carrollton (New Orleans) in the time period, just generally “around” in the theater of operations.  Furthermore, I have not located any references to confirm the presence of howitzers with the regiment.
  • Company A, 10th Missouri Cavalry: At Memphis, Tennessee with four 12-pdr mountain howitzers. The 10th Missouri Cavalry was assigned to the Sixteenth Corps at the start of the summer.  Lieutenant Peter Joyce of Company A had charge of two sections of mountain howitzers. These were cited as “The Banshees” in some accounts of action outside Iuka, Mississippi.

This leaves us with one line remaining – line 50.  And this one is difficult to square up with the records.  The arrow points at the unit designation:

0265_1A_Snip_MO3

I interpret this to read “Col. 3rd Col’d Infy.” or Colonel, 3rd Colored Infantry.  Missouri did raise regiments of colored troops, designated as such and attributed to the state.  But those were soon re-designated in the USCT system.  The 3rd Missouri Colored Infantry began organizing at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, in December 1863.  But the regiment was not mustered until February the following year.  And in March, the regiment became the 67th US Colored Troops.  Thus it is not likely the 3rd Missouri Colored, even as the 67th USCT, are the unit represented by that line.

The other candidate here is the 3rd Missouri Infantry.  As part of the Fifteenth Corps, after Vicksburg the 3rd Missouri remained around Vicksburg.  The regiment moved with its parent formation to reinforce Chattanooga. And there is no record of artillery assigned to this regiment.  So let’s rule them out.

The place name reported, Goodrich’s Landing, is along the Mississippi River about thirty miles upriver from Vicksburg.  It was the site of a contraband camp which was raided by Confederates in June 1863.  Federals reoccupied the camp and maintained a presence there through the war.  And consulting Dyer’s Compendium, there were two USCT artillery batteries posted there in 1864 – Batteries C and D, 2nd US Colored Artillery (re-designated from the 1st and 2nd Louisiana Artillery, African Descent).  Furthermore, among the supporting infantry sent to Goodrich’s Landing was the 3rd Mississippi Colored Infantry, which was later the 53rd USCT.  That, I would submit, is the best set of leads.  Perhaps the clerks in Washington hastily ascribed the 3rd Mississippi to Missouri.  As we know, that occurred with respect to the Mississippi Marine Brigade, despite a loose affiliation with Missouri.   I’ll leave it open for now, but identify this line as such:

  • 3rd Colored Infantry: Reporting at Goodrich’s Landing, Louisiana with two 6-pdr field guns, two 12-pdr field howitzers, and two 3.80-inch James rifles.  A full, but mixed, battery.

So of those nine lines, I think we have solid identification, down to the officer in charge, for five units.  Of the others, one didn’t exist (2nd M.S.M. Battery). Two others are clearly attributed properly to cavalry sections.  Only the 3rd Colored Infantry defies specific identification.  Not bad for the mysterious Missouri batteries.

Moving on to the ammunition pages, we have smoothbore ammunition to account for:

0267_1_Snip_MO3

Lots of mountain howitzer ammunition on hand.  For clarity, I’ll work these in the order they appear, but use my “adjusted” designations:

  • 1st Section, 1st M.S.M. Battery: 36 shell, 50 case, and 40 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.
  • Lovejoy’s Battery, 2nd Cavalry: 14 shell, 44 case, and 11 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.
  • 3rd Colored Infantry: 25 shot, 125 case, and 170 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 157 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Company A, 5th M.S.M. Cavalry: 67 shell and 126 case for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.
  • Company G, 5th M.S.M. Cavalry: 108 case for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.
  • Company G, 6th Cavalry: 24 shell and 26 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.
  • Company A, 10th Cavalry: 72 shell, 203 case, and 102 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

Turning to the rifled projectiles, the first page offers one lone entry for Hotchkiss:

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  • 3rd Colored Infantry: 90 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

And one entry on the over page for Hotchkiss:

0268_1H_Snip_MO3

Same unit again:

  • 3rd Colored Infantry: 50 canister for 3.80-inch James.

Interesting, entries on the Parrott columns:

0268_1P_Snip_MO3

  • 1st Section, 1st M.S.M. Battery: 91 shot, 255 shell, and 79 canister for 2.9-inch rifles.
  • 2nd Section, 1st M.S.M. Battery: 12 shell for 2.9-inch rifles.

These entries seem to imply the rifled guns were distributed between the sections.  Though I would also point out, these were not Parrott rounds, but rather rounds purchased for those English rifles.  I think the clerks simply used the Parrott columns as a handy expedient in the accounting.

No other projectile entries.  So we move to the small arms:

0268_3_Snip_MO3

Three batteries accounting for small arms here:

  • 1st M.S.M. Battery: Twenty navy revolvers, forty-three cavalry sabers, thirty-two horse artillery sabers, and forty-nine foot artillery swords.
  • Company G, 6th Cavalry: Eight Army revolvers and seven cavalry sabers.
  • Company A, 10th Cavalry: Sixty-eight Army revolvers and fifty cavalry sabers.

This post has run longer than most of in the summary series.  I figured it best to take the time to break down the different units by type and at the same time properly attribute the lines to units.  If nothing else, it’s fun to relate these numbers to names.

Note: The proper spelling of Albert Waschman’s name is, in my opinion, up for debate.  We find several derivations in the military records – Wachsman, Waschsman, Wachman, and others. However, most state records have it as Waschman.  And his grave stone says Waschman (which… if there’s anyplace the name would be correct, it has to be the gravestone).  So I’m convinced Waschman is the proper spelling.  I’ve circled back to old posts to make that consistent here on the blog.  If I missed any, please let me know.

Waschman, by the way, was the son-in-law of Jim Bridger, noted “mountain man” and subject of a great Johnny Horton ballad that I’ll leave in your head

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 2nd Missouri (soon to be Light!) Artillery

Given the twists and turns of the regiment’s history, you can probably see why I consider the 2nd Missouri Artillery Regiment a store of those “lesser known” stories from the Civil War.  But our focus with the summaries is what was reported and the context from which those reports were written.  That said, we consult the 2nd Missouri’s summary for the third quarter of 1863, officially ending in September:

0265_1_Snip_MO2

Keep in mind, given the time line in the previous post, what was happening behind the scenes of this summary.  Special Orders No. 219, issued on August 13, directed the muster out of those deemed to have enlisted under the “Reserve Corps” and the reorganization of the regiment.  Also, under that order, a board reviewed all officers of the regiment to determine who would be retained.  Colonel Henry Almstedt resigned on August 27. The first round of muster-outs came in September.  Many of the released officers have a muster out date of September 28.

The start of the reorganization was a new commander.  Nelson Cole came over from the 1st Missouri Artillery, to accept a Lieutenant-Colonel’s position, with date of rank from October 2.  Under Special Orders No 261, issued September 24, Batteries E, L, and M were consolidated into Battery E.  Batteries A and B were concentrated at St. Louis, but was to be organized into a new battery.  Batteries C and D in Cape Girardeau, and likewise reorganized into a new battery.  Other batteries were regrouped geographically, with detachments of D and E around Little Rock, Arkansas; and other batteries   So let’s see how this matches (or not) with the summary given:

  • Battery A: Filing, in July 1864, from Cape Girardeau, Missouri with “infantry stores.”  This battery was the consolidation of the old Batteries C and D.  Captain John E. Strodtman was appointed commander, transferred over from the old Battery G.  (His cards indicate an alias of Emil Strodtman, who appears on the rolls of Battery D, but pending full reconciliation I must consider these two different men for now).   The battery served as heavy artillery in the Cape Girardeau defenses, part of the District of St. Louis.
  • Battery B:  A December return has this battery at New Madrid, Missouri reporting only infantry stores.  Captain John J. Sutter remained in command.  The posting, as heavy artillery, was part of the extended District of St. Louis.
  • Battery C:  An April 1864 return has this battery at Helena, Arkansas with one 6-pdr field gun and one 3.80-inch James Rifle. This data does not match with the known battery history at all.  The new Battery C was formed from the old batteries H and I.  Captain Frederick W. Fuchs, Company I, commanded the new battery.  This new battery was stationed at Cape Girardeau, alongside Battery A, as heavy artillery.  The return from Helena with field guns does not match any of the known history of this battery.
  • Battery D: A timely October 20 return places this battery at Cape Girardeau sitting on “infantry stores.”  This may be partially accurate.  The battery name transferred to St. Louis, concurrent to the regiment reorganization, and reformed with a consolidation of old Batteries A, F, G, and K.  Captain Charles Schareff (formerly of Battery I) was appointed commander at the end of September.  The battery later equipped for the field and sent forward to support the cavalry operating in Southeast Missouri and Northeast Arkansas (raising the possibility Battery C’s return above was actually Battery D’s… reflecting confusion with the reorganization).
  • Battery E: No return.  This battery was, as of the end of September, reorganized from parts of old Batteries E, L, and M, under Captain Gustave Stange (old Battery M).  The battery was assigned to 1st Cavalry Division, Department of Arkansas.  On “paper” this battery was reorganized in St. Louis.  I would offer the men and equipment remained at Little Rock, with the new battery being organized by orders issued in St. Louis.  The battery reported four 12-pdr Mountain howitzers (see below).
  • Battery F: Indicated at Iuka, Mississippi as of October 25, with four 12-pdr field howitzers.  With the regimental reorganization, Captain Clemens Landgraeber’s First Missouri Flying Artillery transferred into the regiment.  The battery supported First Division, Fifteenth Corps and was en-route with other reinforcements sent to Chattanooga.
  • Battery G: A July 1864 return date places the battery at St. Louis.  There is an illegible notation for the battery.  Remaining men in the battery were mostly transferred to Battery A.  The battery reformed on November 15, stationed at Fort No. 3, in St. Louis, “equipped with 3-inch brass guns” according to the State Adjutant-General. Lieutenant William T. Arthur transferred from Battery F, 1st Missouri for a captaincy and command of the new Battery G, 2nd Missouri.
  • Battery H: No return. Most of old Battery H transferred to new Battery C.  A new Battery H formed out of men (new and old enlistments) at Springfield, Missouri on December 4, 1863, under command of Captain William C. Montgomery (formerly of the Missouri State Cavalry).
  • Battery I: A March 1864 return has this battery at Cape Girardeau with infantry stores.  Battery I was also reformed (recreated, may be the more applicable word) in Springfield Missouri.  It’s organization date was December 28, so beyond the scope of this quarter’s summary.  Captain Stephen H. Julian would command.  Julian had previously served with the Missouri State Militia batteries.
  • Battery K: Reporting from Little Rock, Arkansas with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3-inch rifles.  Here again we catch the regiment in the state of reorganization.  This is the old Battery K, at that time part of the 1st Cavalry Division, Department of Arkansas and under Lieutenant Thaddeus S. Clarkson, a former officer on Brigadier-General John Davidson’s staff, and not actually a regimental officer.  However, that old Battery K was broken up, with most of its men transferred to the new Battery D.  A new Battery K was formed in January at Springfield, Missouri with Captain William P. Davis (briefly… but that is for the story ahead) in command.
  • Battery L: No return.  Most of the old Battery L folded into the new Battery E.  A new Battery L formed at Sedalia, Missouri and was formerly the 1st Battery, Missouri State Militia in January.  So we will see them accounted for under the “miscellaneous” portion of Missouri’s returns in this quarter.
  • Battery M: A January 1864 return has this battery at Little Rock, with four 12-pdr mountain howitzers. I would contend this was actually  Captain Gustave Stange’s old Battery M, reorganized into the new Battery E (above).  The new Battery M was organized at Fort No. 2, St. Louis, on February 15, 1864, and thus escapes our summary for this (and next) quarter.  Captain Napoleon Boardman would command this battery.
  • Quartermaster:  “Stores in charge” at St. Louis.  No doubt with all the reorganization ongoing, the regimental quartermaster was likely busy processing the turn in of government equipment from the many men mustering out.  And at the same time, he would need to account for equipment staying with the men, but moving over to new battery designations.  Certainly a job for a perfectionist.

Thus what we see in this section of the summary is a little of the “old” mixed with the “new.”  Of the four batteries reporting field artillery on hand, two were clearly the old batteries, with entries not yet reflecting the reorganization.  A third was a formerly independent battery transferred into the regiment.  The fourth eludes exact identification, but is likely one of the old batteries, prior to reorganization.  These reorganizations would continue through the next two quarters.  And beyond that, the heavy batteries were afterwards re-equipped as light batteries, completing the transformation of the regiment in late 1864.

Another point to make is the nature of the service.  The 2nd Missouri had not been thrust into major campaigns, up to this time of the war.  Other than the batteries, or portions thereof, in Little Rock and the “Flying Artillery” with the Fifteenth Corps, none of these were involved in active campaigns.  Duty with the 2nd Missouri was still “safe” for the third quarter.

That said, we have four batteries worth of ammunition to account for, starting with the smoothbores:

0267_1_Snip_MO2

Four batteries:

  • Battery C: 59 shot, 114 case, and 91 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery F: 240 shell, and 64 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers; 330 case for mountain howitzers (likely a transcription error, and should be under the field howitzer column).
  • Battery K: 62 shell, 10 case, and 43 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery M: 2 shell, 73 case, and 46 canister for 12-pdr mountain howitzers.

Not many, but a few, rifles on hand.  And Hotchkiss for those 3-inch rifles reported:

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  • Battery K: 321 canister, 193 percussion shell, 124 fuse shell, and 188 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

Moving over to the James columns:

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  • Battery C: 80 shot, 150 shell, and 70 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

And more in that caliber under the Schenkl columns:

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  • Battery C: 40 Schenkl case for 3.80-inch rifles.

We then turn to the small arms:

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By battery:

  • Battery F: Twelve (?) Army revolvers, twenty Navy revolvers, and eighty-one cavalry sabers.
  • Battery K: Fifty-five Army revolvers, Thirty-nine Navy revolvers and thirty-four horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Seventeen Army revolvers, sixty-four Navy revolvers, sixty-seven cavalry sabers, and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • Quartermaster: Sixteen Army revolvers and sixteen cavalry sabers.

The report of small arms looks suspicious to me.  We don’t usually see a mix of revolver calibers.  Usually the battery was issued one or the other.  Where there are a mix reported, the quantities of one of the two is usually short.  Here we see substantial quantities.   Almost as if a column was transposed. But without the original returns, it would be impossible to determine where that error might be… if in error at all.

Though I would point out the quartermaster line has a nice even sixteen and sixteen.  As if sixteen officers turned in their pistols and sabers before mustering out.  Perhaps?

We are not done with Missouri for this quarter.  There are nine lines below the 2nd Missouri for militia batteries, independent batteries, and artillery sections in the other arms.

 

A Brief History of the 2nd Missouri Artillery

The story of the 2nd Missouri Artillery is very much atypical, when considered beside other artillery formations raised during the Civil War.  Yet, that atypical unit history is somewhat a typical for Missouri regiments.  I’ve discussed some aspects of the 2nd Missouri’s history in previous posts (see here, here, here, here, and here).  But let’s go into a few more of those particulars, just so you see how “atypical” this unit was.

The 2nd Missouri Artillery’s origins lay in those confrontational days in May 1861.  Missouri was teetering on the verge of secession and a young Army captain named Nathaniel Lyon moved to prevent such.  In order to put a force on the streets of St. Louis, Lyon acted, not with direct authority at that moment in time, to muster a force of Missouri militia into Federal service for a period of three months.  Lyon later received full backing, and a brigadier-general’s star, in these efforts.  The militia mustered by Lyon were designated the “United States Reserve Corps” and, under terms of enlistment, were limited to duty in St. Louis… though later stretched a bit to include locations in eastern Missouri.  This Reserve Corp consisted of five infantry regiments and one cavalry company.

By late July, when these units were nearing muster out, Lyon’s adjutant, Major John M. Schofield, issued Special Orders No. 19, in which allowed the three month Reserve Corps to muster out, but be replaced by units raised with three-year enlistments.  That is, provided no other “emergencies” arose that required those militia to remain in service.

But before those orders could be applied, Lyon had met his end at Wilson’s Creek and there was just such an “emergency” to deal with.  Lyon’s replacement, Major-General John C. Fremont, expanded the Reserve Corps, retaining the five regiments of infantry and adding two squadrons of cavalry and two batteries of light artillery, under orders issued on August 12, 1861.  This expansion used the authorities granted under Special Orders No. 19 to enlist men for three years.  Under Fremont’s organization, or lack thereof, several formations were raised under designations of “Home Guards” or “Reserve Corps.” By late October, Fremont expanded these reserves again to include the First Reserve Corps Artillery – twelve companies of heavy artillery and three batteries of light artillery.   And it is those fifteen “Reserve Corps” artillery companies/batteries which eventually became the 2nd Missouri Artillery.

When Fremont was relieved of command on November 2, he left behind a bureaucratic mess.  Major-General George B. McClellan charged Major-General Henry Halleck with cleaning that up.  Instructions sent on November 11 read in part:

In assigning you to command the Department of the Missouri, it is probably unnecessary for me to state that I have intrusted to you a duty which requires the utmost tact and decision.  You have not merely the ordinary duties of a military commander to perform, but the far more difficult task of reducing chaos to order.

And who better to assign to that task than Halleck? McClellan went on to instruct Halleck to examine all unit musters to identify “any illegal, unusual, or improper organizations….” And in those cases, Halleck offered legal, three-year enlistments as a means of retaining the formations.  Simple solution, right?

But Halleck had a problem for which there was no simple solution.  The men of this “Reserve Corps” and the Home Guards had enlisted with several stipulations and guarantees.  One of which was service only in the state (or in some cases within St. Louis).  Furthermore, the authority of the U.S. officers was somewhat limited over these state formations.  By mid-December, Halleck decided the best way to resolve this was simply pay off the troops for the time in service, and go about recruiting new three-year regiments.

However, hindering Halleck’s attempt to clear out this “chaos” was the paymaster’s refusal to pay troops who had not been properly mustered, and for whom rolls were incomplete. And at the same time, subordinate commanders were reluctant to simply release these able body men, as they might not reenlist.

Finally, on January 17, 1862, Halleck found a compromise and issued General Orders No. 22, which read in part:

Organizations which have been mustered into the United States service under the title of “Reserve Corps,” or other designations, are regularly in the military service of the United States, and are to be paid and supplied the same as any other troops.  It is not the intention to require the service of such troops out of this State, except in cases of emergency, but they must do the same duty as other troops, and any refusal on their part to obey orders will be punished to the full extent of the law…

Concurrent with that order, the infantry regiments (which were actually designated by numbered “Reserve Corps” on the books) were consolidated into volunteer regiments.  This led to mutinies and desertions throughout the first half of 1862.  Commanders rated the units as “useless” for the duties required.  The story of the infantry and cavalry “Reserve Corps” falls out of our scope here.  So the short version is that on September 1, 1862, Schofield (now a Brigadier-General and in charge of the District of Missouri) issued Special Orders No. 98 directing the muster out of all Reserve Corps regiments.

But the artillery of the Reserve Corps was a different story.  Under Halleck’s early attempts to bring order, the Reserve Corps artillery was redesignated the 2nd Missouri Artillery Regiment (orders dated November 20, 1861).  Colonel Henry Almstedt was appointed commander. Furthermore a mustering officer had processed the artillery troops into formal, legal, three-year terms.  Indeed, around that time some 320 men who didn’t wish to remain as three-year volunteers opted to muster out.  By January 1862, most of the regiment’s batteries were considered organized and were actually drawing in more recruits (all new three-year enlistments).

In the fall of 1862, hearing the infantry and cavalry were being mustered out, the artillerists also asked for their pay-out.  But instead of mustering out, those batteries, now the 2nd Missouri Artillery and considered a volunteer regiment, were to be retained.  In General Orders No. 21, issued on November 29 by Major-General Samuel Curtis (replacing Halleck in command of the Department of the Missouri), the Second was defined under a different enlistment status:

The Second Missouri Artillery was first enrolled as Home Guards, but with their own consent they were afterwards regularly mustered in as three-year volunteers… and the matter was fully explained in German and English.

But now, seeing how the other Reserves had been treated, all the artillerists were clamoring for their release.  General Schofield, commanding the subordinate District of Missouri, added to this:

The Second Missouri Artillery was reorganized and became volunteers soon after Major-General Halleck assumed command of the department.  Therefore it is not to be considered as belonging to the Reserve Corps.  But even were this not the case, that regiment would be retained in service, since their services are needed in the position for which they were originally enlisted, and there are no other troops which can be used to replace them.  Therefore the Second Missouri Artillery will not be mustered out of service.

The logic of this and other statements was lost on the rank and file.  The problem festered through the winter.  On March 30, 1863, Brigadier-General J. W. Davidson, commanding the St. Louis District, complained about the 2nd Missouri:

A detachment of this regiment at Pilot Knob serving with a battery is in mutiny.  Another serving with a battery at Benton Barracks was recently in mutiny.  Another serving as heavy artillery at Cape Girardeau was recently in mutiny.  A detachment serving with the Twenty-second Iowa Volunteers by department orders left that regiment and is, I am informed, in this city, thus deserting their station.  This calls for a decision upon the difference between the officers and men as to what the regiment is, whether as volunteers or Reserve Corps.

In reaction to the mutinies and other troubles, Curtis convened a board of inquiry in April.  That board concluded the regiment’s original muster, in the summer of 1861, had been illegal.  Furthermore, the change of status to three-year enlistments was invalid.  The board recommended that the regiment be reorganized, should the command deem it necessary to retain the 2nd Missouri in service.  And Curtis agreed with that suggestion.

Curtis then punted this up to his boss in Washington… who just happened to be Halleck at that time of the war.  On May 15, Halleck responded, “This regiment was remustered as volunteers for three years or the war, while I commanded the department, and under the supervision of a staff officer…. There could have been no possible misunderstanding on this subject, and General Curtis was wrong in again reviewing the question.” Halleck concluded by offering a few “hard” solutions:

Those men who were unfit for service should have been discharged and the regiment filled up or its organization reduced.  The men had no claim whatever for a discharge on the ground of improper enlistment.

And now the regiment should be filled up, if possible, and if not, its organization should be reduced.

While all this correspondence was passing between St. Louis and Washington, the war situation put another spin on the 2nd Missouri’s problems.  The spring of 1863 was full of activity on all fronts and Missouri was no exception.  In April, Brigadier-General John S. Marmaduke raided through southeast Missouri (I’ve written on Chalk Bluff, which occurred at the end of that raid).  Marmaduke threatened several points and put up a scare that St. Louis would be attacked.  And while preparing the city’s defenses, Curtis went so far as to promise the 2nd Missouri Artillery that “… if they would do their duty as soldiers till the trouble was over they should be mustered out.”

Promises made, but the bureaucracy still had to be appeased. Through the early summer the men remained in the regiment and were none too happy about it. Not until July 27 did Schofield formally request a disposition on the matter, adding the sharp assessment that the 2nd Missouri “.. is a disgrace to the service, as well as utterly useless.”  With that, official authorization came on August 3 to muster out the men from the original “Reserve Corps” enlistments.  But that was not to apply to men who’d volunteered directly into the 2nd Missouri starting in 1862.  To cover the process involved, Schofield issued Special Orders No. 219 on August 13.  After covering administrative details, the last paragraphs, dictating the unit’s disposition, read:

The Second Missouri Artillery Volunteers will be reorganized and recruited to its maximum as rapidly as practicable.

For this purpose a military board will be appointed to examine the capacity, qualifications, propriety of conduct, and efficiency of all the commissioned officers of the regiment, and to consolidate the men remaining in the regiment after the muster out hereby ordered into the proper number of full companies.  Upon the report of this board the commanding general will order the muster out of such officers as shall not be found fitted for their positions.

This order cleared the way to finally, and permanently, resolving the issues caused by Fremont’s hasty organization, Halleck’s blunt approach to reconciliation to regulations, and Curtis’s somewhat tone-def management…. if I may be so bold.

In short order, the regiment was reduced to a battalion.  Captain Nelson Cole, who was then on staff as the Artillery Chief for the district, transferred out of Battery E, 1st Missouri to accept a Lieutenant-Colonel’s position in the Second Missouri.  Cole’s date of rank was October 2, 1863.  And that date might be considered the start of the reorganization of the regiment.

Enough men remained to form five companies of heavy artillery.  The First Flying Battery, originally Pfenninghausen’s and later Landgraeber’s Battery, an independent formation, transferred in to become Battery F.  The 1st Missouri State Militia Battery (also known as Thurber’s or Waschman’s Battery) became Battery L.  And new enlistments began to fill in the rest of the ranks. Not until February was the regiment completely reorganized to full strength.  At which time, Cole was promoted to Colonel.

From that point forward to the end of the war, the 2nd Missouri Artillery had a less contentious and administratively conventional history.  In 1864, most of the heavy artillery companies were reequipped as field artillery.  These batteries would see field service in Missouri, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Georgia.  One battery served in the Atlanta Campaign.  Most of the others saw service repelling Price from Missouri in the fall months of 1864.  The field grade officers, including Cole, served in several key staff positions, providing a cadre of artillery chiefs. As many of those three-year enlistments remained at the close of the war, the regiment was only slowly mustered out.  Some batteries saw service on the Powder River Expedition of 1865, under a column commanded by Cole.

We might say that despite its unconventional origin and mutinous reputation, the 2nd Missouri matured into a very proper organization by the end of the war.

Sources: Aside from the Official Records and other common sources, material for this post comes from “Missouri troops in service during the civil war : Letter from the Secretary of war, in response to the Senate resolution passed on June 14, 1902”, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1902. 

Summary Statement, 3rd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Missouri Light Artillery

The summary of returns for the 1st Missouri Light Artillery covering the third quarter of 1863 are interesting due to the appearance of out-of-the-ordinary artillery pieces.  Likewise, the summary of their service during the quarter is of interest due to many of the lesser known Civil War campaigns that must be mentioned.  Colonel Warren L. Lothrop commanded the regiment.  But as field grade artillerists were in short supply in the west, Lothrop pulled duty as the Chief of Artillery for the Sixteenth Corps, in Memphis, during the summer and fall of 1863.

Looking at the list of Lothrop’s command,  we find nine of the twelve batteries with registered returns:

0265_1_Snip_MO1

And of those nine received, four were not received in Washington until 1864.  But the information we have to work from speaks to the “moving parts” in the western theater during the late summer of 1863:

  • Battery A: Reported from Carrolton, Louisiana with two 6-pdr field guns, one 12-pdr Napoleon and three 12-pdr field howitzers.  Captain George W. Schofield remained in command.  However, Schofield took a well deserved leave in October (and was due for a promotion).   In his absence, Lieutenant Elisha Cole lead the battery.  After the fall of Vicksburg, the battery moved with Thirteenth Corps to New Orleans.  There it was on duty around New Orleans until October.
  • Battery B:  No return.  Also assigned to the Thirteenth Corps, this battery was also in New Orleans at the end of September.  Captain Martin Welfley’s battery remained with Second Division of the corps.  Welfley had reported two 12-pdr field guns and four 12-pdr field howitzers earlier in the previous winter.  Records are not clear if those were still on hand as of September 1863 or those had been exchanged.
  • Battery C: Reporting from Vicksburg, Mississippi with four (up from two) 12-pdr field howitzers (having turned in two 6-pdr field guns).  Captain Charles Mann remained in command, with the battery assigned to Sixth Division (later re-designated First), Seventeenth Corps.  Mann would be promoted to Major at the start of November.  Captain John L. Matthaei was appointed to replace him.
  • Battery D:  At Corinth, Mississippi, with three 6-pdr field guns (up from two the previous quarter), two 12-pdr field howitzers, one 24-pdr field howitzer (an addition this quarter) and two 3-inch rifles.  The battery, under Captain Henry Richardson was assigned to Corinth, part of the Sixteenth Corps. However, at the start of October the battery transferred to Fourth Division, Fifteenth Corps and sent to Chattanooga. At that time, Richardson was the division artillery chief, with Lieutenant Byron M. Callender leading the battery.
  • Battery E: Reporting at Brownsville, Texas with four 10-pdr Parrotts and two “Rebel Trophies English 3.5.”  Yet another designation change for the same weapons.  These were “Fawcett Rifled Iron Gun, Cal. 3.5.” in the second quarter.  After Vicksburg, Captain Nelson Cole’s battery was assigned to Second Division, Thirteenth Corps and sent to New Orleans.  As of August 10, Cole was promoted to Major and assigned staff duties in Missouri (and later to command of the 2nd Missouri Artillery).  Lieutenant Joseph B. Atwater took his place in command of the battery. In September the battery was involved with operations on the Atchafalaya River.  The Brownsville location, however, is relative to the reporting date of January 1864.
  • Battery F: On Mustang Island, Texas with two 3.80-inch James Rifles and four 3.5-inch Fawcett Guns. The location reflects a reporting date of September 1863. Captain Joseph Foust remained in command, and the battery assigned to Second Division, Thirteenth Corps.  As of the end of September, the battery was at Carrolton, Louisiana.  The Texas location is from the December reporting date (and a story for the next quarter).
  • Battery G: No return.  Captain Henry Hescock’s battery was assigned to the Third Division, Twentieth Corps. Hescock was also listed as commander of the artillery brigade supporting the division.  That left Lieutenant Gustavus Schueler to lead the battery. The battery brought four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 10-pdr Parrotts to Chickamauga, seeing action on September 20.  The battery fired 277 rounds in the battle.  And Hescock was captured (and would remain a prisoner until the end of the war).
  • Battery H: At Corinth, Mississippi now rearmed with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Frederick Welker’s battery was part of the garrison at Corinth, under the Sixteenth Corps.
  • Battery I:  Reporting at Pocahontas, Tennessee (a railroad stop northwest of Corinth), with two 6-pdr field guns, one 12-pdr field howitzers, two 10-pdr Parrotts, and one 4.62-inch rifle (likely a 12-pdr “heavy” field gun, rifled using the James system).  Captain Benjamin Tannrath commanded the battery, assigned to the Sixteenth Corps, under the Corinth Garrison.
  • Battery K: At Little Rock, Arkansas with four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain Stillman O. Fish was in command.  The battery was part of the District of Eastern Arkansas.
  • Battery L: No return.  Captain Frank Backof’s Battery remained at Rolla, likely with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.67-inch rifles. At the end of September, Backof was busy recruiting.  In October he was promoted to Major in the 2nd Missouri Artillery.  Captain Junius G. Wilson McMurray transferred from Battery M to command in the interim.
  • Battery M: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 10-pdr Parrotts.  This battery remained assigned to Seventh (later First) Division, Seventeenth Corps.  In McMurray’s place, Lieutenant John H. Tiemeyer had command of the battery.

The First Missouri Artillery was thus spread across the Mississippi River Valley doing good work.  And they had perhaps the widest array of cannon for any artillery regiment at this time of the war.

We turn then to the ammunition, starting with the smoothbore.

0267_1_Snip_MO1

Note the extended columns here to include those 24-pdr howitzer rounds:

  • Battery A: 390 shot, 343 case, and 85 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 90 shot, 71 shell, 144 case, and 40 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; and 410 shell, 565 case, and 114 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery C: 220 shell, 220 case, and 130 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery D: 191 shot, 140 case, and 159 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 119 shell, 162 case, and 38 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers; and 39 shell, 24 case, and 24 canister for 24-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery H: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; plus 53 case for 24-pdr field howitzers (which the battery had on hand the previous quarter).
  • Battery I: 43 shot, 223 case, and 109 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 69 shell, 46 case, and 70 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.

In addition to those batteries reported here, in his report from the battle of Chickamauga Schueler recorded firing 26 shot, 86 shell, 94 case, and 9 canister.   An interesting mix of ammunition fired.  In action the battery was under  fire mostly from infantry. They suffered four casualties to musketry.  Something to think about with this being a “close” action.

Moving over the the rifled projectiles, a couple of lines on the Hotchkiss page:

0267_2_Snip_MO1

  • Battery D: 40 canister, 98 percussion shell, and 146 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery F: 29 shot, 224 percussion shell, and 45 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Let’s break the next page down by sections for clarity.  Starting with the additional Hotchkiss columns:

0268_1H_Snip_MO1

  • Battery F: 103 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Now the James patent projectiles:

0268_1J_Snip_MO1

  • Battery I: 10 shot, 58 shell, and 50 canister for 4.62-inch or 12-pdr James rifles.

Then lots of Parrott rounds:

0268_1P_Snip_MO1

Among five batteries:

  • Battery E: 60 shot, 190 shell, 115 case, and 35 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery H:  10 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts (left over from the previous quarter).
  • Battery I: 54 shot, 118 shell, 74 case, and 64 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery K: 20 shot, 66 shell, 238 case, and 112 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.
  • Battery M: 126 shot, 265 shell, 373 case, and 130 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

Of note, Schueler reported Battery G fired 5 case and 57 shell from 10-pdr Parrotts at Chickamuaga.

No Schenkl projectiles reported.  So we move to the small arms:

0268_3_Snip_MO1

By battery:

  • Battery A: Nine Navy revolvers and twenty-five cavalry sabers.
  • Battery C: Two Army revolvers and four cavalry sabers.
  • Battery D: Eight Army revolvers and thirty cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E: Twenty-three Army revolvers and four cavalry sabers.
  • Battery F: One Army revolver and two cavalry sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty-two Army revolvers, three Navy revolvers, and sixty-three horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Seventeen Army revolvers, 113 cavalry sabers, and one horse artillery saber.
  • Battery K: Three Navy revolvers
  • Battery M: Four Army revolvers and seven cavalry sabers.

Aside from the three batteries not reporting, the important missing piece here is the ammunition for the 3.5-inch English rifles.  There is a paperwork trail showing contracts for production of 3.5-inch rounds.  And we can assume the Missourians didn’t haul those down to Texas without carrying a few chests full of those.  But as far as the returns are concerned, the clerks at the Ordnance Department had no columns for to track those.

Say it together – Bureaucracy!

 

Hops and History – September 20

Another event coming up in the next few months that I’d bring to your attention:
HopsAndHistorySept20

Loudoun County Public Library’s program of “Hops and History” aims to bring history out to a less formal setting.  In this case, Dragon Hops Brewing, in Purcellville, Virginia.

My talk will focus on the Army of the Potomac’s movements through Loudoun County in June 1863.  With this being a localized event, I will provide more coverage of the stories, places, and participants in Loudoun… and less so to the grand strategy and operations.  In short, we will consider the marks left behind by the passing of that army… in addition to how the army’s stay in Loudoun affected its performance on the fields at Gettysburg.

Again, the event details:

Location: Dragon Hops Brewing, 130 East Main Street, Purcellville, Virginia 20132

Date/Time: Thursday, September 20, at 7 p.m.

Hop…. um… Hope to see you there!

Upcoming event: Big Gun Expedition to Bull Run

I have a couple of events, or should I say appearances, to announce. The first of these, as Harry Smeltzer posted last week, is an artillery-focused tour of First Bull Run. Here’s Harry’s pitch:

If big guns are your bag, you won’t want to miss a day at Manassas National Battlefield Park retracing the steps of the Union and Confederate artillerists during the First Battle of Bull Run with widely regarded expert Craig Swain and your humble host, me. Same game plan – no fees, everything is on your own (food, lodging, transportation). We’ll meet up at 9 AM on October 20, 2018 and head out onto the field. Dress appropriately – tour is rain or shine.

Expect to discuss all aspects of artillery: gun manufacture and capabilities, tactics of the day, and the action. We’ll also discuss some of the personalities involved.

This will be the FIRST artillery tour of First Bull Run since Henry Hunt led a staff ride over the field in March of 1864….

NO… I’m making that up.

But I would say the artillerymen have been given less attention than deserved for their actions at First Bull Run.  Much attention is focused on the employment of batteries on Henry House Hill which proved a crucial turn in the battle.  And much has been heaped – wrongly in my opinion – over the notion of “flying batteries” or “artillery charges.”   Though little has been mentioned of the other ten Federal in the campaign… or the more than a dozen Confederate batteries on the field.

When Harry first proposed this tour subject, he promised  a “no holds barred” concept.  Mostly, we’ll consider the nuances of drill and tactics as employed in this “early war” setting.  But be prepared for discussions of the “metallurgical art of cannon making” along with some “practice of battery command” topics.  I promise not to break out the trigonometry tables, however, as we won’t actually be shooting off anything!

If you are interested, Harry has setup a Facebook event page.  Please let us know if you plan to attend, so we can best factor logistics.