Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery

The 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery (also known as the 43rd Pennsylvania Volunteers) was, perhaps, short-changed with its organization.  Instead of a full compliment of batteries, the 1st Pennsylvania only ever had Batteries A through I.  And even with that, Battery I was only organized in the war’s last months. Thus for the second quarter of 1863, we have only eight batteries to account for.

In June 1863, Colonel Robert M. West led the regiment, on the rolls.

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West, appearing in this photo with his lovely daughter, was at Yorktown, Virginia in a role that was more “garrison commander” than “field commander.”  His staff and one battery were at that location.  Overall, of the eight batteries in his small-ish regiment, only five had recorded returns for the quarter:

0217_1_Snip_PA_1st

Accounting for those in detail:

  • Battery A: No return.  Captain John G. Simpson’s battery was assigned to Second Division, Seventh Corps, then in the Norfolk area.  I believe the battery retained four 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery participated in the Siege of Suffolk and Dix’s Peninsula Campaign.
  • Battery B: Showing as at Rappahannock Station, Virginia, as of August 16, 1863, with four 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  But with an assignment to First Corps, we know well Captain James H. Cooper’s battery was, as of June 30, moving up toward Gettysburg.
  • Battery C: Claiming to be at Culpeper, Virginia… well in October, 1863… with  six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles (as opposed to 10-pdr Parrotts from the last quarter).  Captain Jeremiah McCarthy remained in command.  On June 25, the battery was sent out of the Army of the Potomac to Camp Barry, D.C.  However, by the end of the Gettysburg Campaign, the battery was back in the field at Harpers Ferry.
  • Battery D: No return.  Battery D was consolidated with Battery C through August.  Thus we list Battery D as at Camp Barry.  Lieutenant Andrew Rosney was the ranking officer of the battery.
  • Battery E: At Yorktown, Virginia with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain Thomas G. Orwig commanded this battery, assigned to First Division, Fourth Corps.
  • Battery F: Indicated at Falmouth, Virginia, with a March 1864 reporting date, with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain R. Bruce Ricketts commanded a combined Batteries F and G, in 3rd Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve.  Thus their proper location, for June 30, was somewhere on the march up from Frederick, Maryland.
  • Battery G: Dittos indicating Battery G was with Battery F for the reporting period.  Lieutenant Belden Spence was the ranking officer remaining with the battery.
  • Battery H: At Camp Barry, D.C. with four 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Andrew Fagan commanded this battery, which in the Artillery Reserve, Fourth Corps.  Thus the battery was actually around Yorktown at reporting time.  The battery would transfer to Camp Barry in the fall.

And as mentioned above, Battery I would not muster until very late in the war.  Batteries K, L, and M never existed, save for a notional line allocated on the clerk’s form.

Only two lines of smoothbore ammunition to account for:

0219_1_Snip_PA_1st

  • Battery E: 176 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 80 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery H: 182 shot, 54 shell, 162 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

No disputes there.

We move to the rifled projectile pages, starting with Mr. Hotchkiss’s types:

0219_2_Snip_PA_1st

Three batteries reporting:

  • Battery B: 20 canister, 180 fuse shell, and 338 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 180 canister, 104 percussion shell, and 344(?) bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery F & G: 120 canister, 120 fuse shell, and 840 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

Yes, a lot of case… er… bullet… in those chests.

We skip past the Dyers, James, and Parrott projectiles, with none reported, and go to the Schenkl:

0220_2_Snip_PA_1st

Again, three batteries reporting:

  • Battery B: 277 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 158 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery F & G: 120 shell for 3-inch rifles.

Lastly, we look at the small arms reported:

0220_3_Snip_PA_1st

By battery:

  • Battery B: Sixteen Navy revolvers and fourteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C: Seventeen Navy revolvers and five (?) cavalry sabers.
  • Battery E: Eight Navy revolvers and fourteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery F & G: Sixteen Army revolvers, eight Navy revolvers, one cavalry saber, and nineteen horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery H: Fourteen Navy revolvers and eleven horse artillery sabers.

Thus rounds out the 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery’s report for the second quarter, 1863.

108th Day of the Siege – Enemy Opened Fire : 2nd Major Bombardment of Fort Sumter

On this day in 1863, around 12:30 PM, the Federal batteries on Morris Island along with two monitors in the main ship channel, opened a massive bombardment of Fort Sumter.  As detailed back during the sesquicentennial, that eruption marked the start of the Second Major Bombardment of the fort.  Those “major” and “minor” bombardments, along with “desultory” bombardments, were defined by the Confederates on the receiving end.  Though the periods track well with Federal operational accounts.  And this “major” was indeed a rather substantial bombardment by any measure. Between October 26 and December 6, the Federals fired over 18,000 rounds at Fort Sumter.  That’s not counting shots fired at other points in and around Charleston during the same period, which was no small number.

The following morning, subscribers to the Charleston Courier saw this lead on the second column of the front page:

CharlestonCourier_Oct_27_63_Vol_LXI_Issue19607_P1_Col2

Notice how this news was titled and categorized.  This was the 108th day, going back to July 10, of the siege of Fort Sumter and for all practical purposes Charleston itself.  This is a point I drive home in presentations about the war around Charleston.  The siege of Fort Sumter was the longest battle of the war, running from the summer of 1863 through February 1865.  And by extension, the campaign against Charleston was the longest of the war, if we take into account the blockade operations beginning in May 1861.  The citizens of Charleston, the Confederates defending Charleston, and the Federals on Morris Island all counted those days.

The full article read:

News from the Islands.

One Hundred and Eighth Day of the Siege – Enemy Opened Fire

The enemy on Morris’ Island having completed his preparations, about half-past 10 o’clock, Monday morning, opened a vigorous fire from Batteries Gregg and Wagner, with seven guns mounted in the former and four in the latter, all of heavy calibre, being mostly two and three hundred pounder Parrotts.  The heaviest fire was directed on Fort Sumter.  Out of one hundred and eighty-eight shots fired from Morris’ Island at Fort Sumter during the day, one hundred and sixty-five struck the fort and twenty-three passed over.  Two of the guns on Battery Gregg devoted their entire attention to Fort Johnson, which also received an occasional shot from Battery Wagner.

Forts Moultrie and Johnson, and batteries Marion, Simkins and Cheves, kept up a spirited reply.  The firing on both sides ceased about dark.  The enemy threw some ten or fifteen shots and shells from a twelve pounder Parrott, mounted on Gregg, at Battery Bee and Fort Moultrie, but did no damage.  Two monitors, which rounded Cummings’ Point, were also engaged, and fired some ten shots at Sumter.  No casualties to the garrisons or injuries to the works are reported at any of the forts or batteries.

The fire from Fort Moultrie and the batteries upon the advanced Monitors and the enemy’s works, was excellent, and it is believed did considerable execution.  It was reported that one of the enemy’s guns burst in Battery Gregg early in the action Monday morning on the third or fourth trial.

The firing is expected to be renewed this morning.  With the exception of the two Monitors engaged there was no change in the position of the fleet.

The newspaper report is noteworthy in the details.  However, Federal sources insist the bombardment began around noon, and not earlier.  And there is not mention of a burst gun on that day from Federal accounts (although, one is recorded as bursting the following day).  Usually, and I doubt this day’s report was any exception, the Courier’s writers blended information obtained from Confederate officers along with what their reporters saw first hand.  After all, the war was happening, day and night, right outside their windows.

On the other side of the battle line, the 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery was very active, handling the big guns. From their regimental history:

Please notice the handling of one of those guns.  The piece has just recoiled from the last firing, and is out of battery; it is instantly depressed to a level; up step the spongers; back and forth, with a rolling twist, goes the sponge, and it is withdrawn; up rises the great bag-like cartridge and is entered; quickly the rammers drive it home to the clean, moist, but warm chamber; stout men lift the great conical shell and pass it into the black lips of the monster; and again the rammers bend to their work and drive back the projectile upon the powder; now the gunners heave the piece into battery; the sergeant looks to and adjusts the training, right or left; now he turns to secure again his proper and exact elevation, and makes his allowance for windage; the primer is entered; the lanyard is attached, and the gunner, standing behind the traverse, waits order.  The officer cries: “Ready!  Fire!” Hold your ears.  Note the smoke – an aerial maelstrom and cataract, with voice of an earthquake.  See that black spot traveling on its parabolic journey.  Ha! How smokes and tumbles the rebel wall.  Up go the loyal cheers and the boys pat their gun.

This work would continue, shot after shot, day after day, through the first week of December.  Some days the fire would slack to only a hundred or so rounds, particularly toward the first week of December.  But in those early days of the Second Major Bombardment, the tallies often reached 900 or 1000 rounds a day.

Such was the start of a loud phase in a long battle.

(Citations from Charleston Courier, October 27, 1863, page 1, column 2; Frederic Denison, Shot and Shell: The Third Rhode Island Heavy Artillery Regiment in the Rebellion, 1861-1865, Providence, R.I.: Third Rhode Island Artillery Veterans Association, 1879, page 195.)

 

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – 1st Ohio Light Artillery

The 1st Ohio LIGHT Artillery…. which needs to be emphasized, as there was a 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery.  The “heavy” regiment spent most of the war in garrison locations across Kentucky and Tennessee.  The “light” regiment, on the other hand, was active in the field supporting armies in both eastern and western theaters. Colonel of the regiment was James Barnett, who also doubled as the Chief of Artillery, Department/Army of the Cumberland.

For the second quarter of 1863, the clerks in Washington complied reports from nine of twelve batteries:

0217_1_Snip_Ohio_1st

And, as a bonus, we have a line for the 32nd Ohio Infantry and their four cannon.  As mentioned while discussing the independent batteries, the clerks opted to misplace what would become the 26th Independent Battery with the 1st Ohio Light.

Putting that on hold for the moment, let us look at the administrative details for the 1st Ohio Light:

  • Battery A: Reported, as of August 1864, at Tullahoma, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Wilbur F. Goodspeed remained in command of this battery assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
  • Battery B: “In the field” with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.   Remaining under Captain William E. Standart, this battery was part of Second Division, Twenty-First Corps (with Standart also serving as division chief of artillery). The battery remained at Cripple Creek, Tennessee until June 24, when it moved with the rest of the division on the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery C: At Elk River, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain Daniel K. Southwick commanded the battery assigned to Third Division, Fourteenth Corps.  The battery supported its parent division on the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery D: No report. Battery D was, as of the June 30 reporting date, in the field supporting the Cavalry of the Army of the Cumberland, supporting different operations and operating by sections.  One section, under Captain Andrew J. Konkle supported Second Brigade, First Division, of the corps.  Another, under Lieutenant Nathaniel M. Newell, supported First Brigade, Second Division.  A third section supported the cavalry of the Twenty-third Corps, Department of the Ohio, under Lieutenant Henry C. Lloyd. The battery was armed with 3-inch Ordnance rifles.
  • Battery E: No report. This battery was assigned to Second Division, Reserve Corps, still recovering from heavy losses the previous winter at Stones River.  It was posted to Nashville through the spring.  Lieutenant Stephen W. Dorsey remained in command of the battery.  Later in July, the battery moved forward to Chattanooga.  Captain Warren P. Edgarton, of the battery, was in command of the Nashville garrison artillery.
  • Battery F: No report. Captain Daniel T. Cockerill remained in command of this battery, part of Second Division, Twenty-first Corps. Consolidated reports, complied at the department, indicate the battery had six 12-pdr Napoleons and five 3.80-inch James Rifles (!).
  • Battery G: At Decherd, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Alexander Marshall’s battery assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  As such, they were involved with the Tullahoma Campaign.
  • Battery H: At Brownsville, Maryland (likely a location associated with the August 7th report date) with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Although Captain James F. Huntington held the command billet, Lieutenant George W. Norton lead the battery in the field.  Transferred to the 3rd Volunteer Brigade, Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac in late spring.  Thus, instead sitting at the base of South Mountain on June 30, Battery H was north of Frederick, Maryland.
  • Battery I: At Emmitsburg, Maryland with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Hubert Dilger’s battery was assigned to Eleventh Corps.  Dilger and his battery would do good work supporting the left of the corps on July 1.
  • Battery K: Bridgeport, Alabama, with four 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain William L. De Beck resigned on May 11, 1863, and was replaced by Captain Lewis Heckman.  This battery supported Eleventh Corps.  On July 1, the battery went into action just on the edge of Gettysburg (corner of Carlisle Street and Lincoln Avenue today).  Heckman reported firing 113 rounds that day, “mostly canister”, in an effort to delay the Confederate advance. The battery lost two men killed, eleven men wounded, nine horses, and two pieces.  The location is valid for later in the fall when the battery, along with the rest of the Eleventh Corps, reinforced Chattanooga.
  • Battery L: “In the field” with six 12-pdr Napoleons. Captain Frank C. Gibbs had command of this battery, supporting Fifth Corps.  The battery played a vital role defending Little Round Top on July 2, 1863.
  • Battery M: Stevenson, Alabama with two 3-inch guns and four 3.80-inch James rifles. Captain Frederick Schultz commanded this battery, assigned to Second Division, Fourteenth Corps.  Thus, instead of being just south of Bridgeport, Alabama, as indicated on this line, the battery was further north, near Hoover’s Gap, on June 30, 1863.

As mentioned, one line from outside the regiment:

  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with two 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  Company F, 32nd Ohio was originally formed in August 1861.  In July 1862, the company was detached for service as artillery and known as “Potts’s Ohio Battery” after it’s first commander, Captain Benjamin F. Potts.  The battery served in the Shenandoah and was caught up in the surrender at Harpers Ferry in September 1862.  The battery was exchanged, along with the rest of the regiment, on January 21, 1863.  The 32nd was then assigned to Third Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Corps, then in operations against Vicksburg.   At Champion’s Hill, the brigade captured a Confederate battery.  The division commander, Major General John A. Logan, knowing of the unit’s artillery service, assigned the captured guns to Company F.  Under Captain Theobold D. Yost, they were called “Yost’s Captured Battery” and were posted opposite Fort Hill in the Vicksburg siege lines.  After the siege, the battery was broken up, with men assigned to other batteries.  However, in December 1863, the battery was officially reformed as the 26th (Independent) Ohio Battery.  The exact identification of the guns assigned to the battery during the siege, being captured from Confederates, is open for interpretation.

From top to bottom, including the battery formed from the 32nd, we see all these batteries experienced active field service that summer.

Moving to the ammunition pages, we see a busy section for smoothbore projectiles:

0219_1_Snip_Ohio_1st

A pyramid of rounds:

  • Battery A: 56 shot, 64 shell, 108 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery B: 40 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • Battery C: 13 shot, 42 case, and 46 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 96 shot, 82 shell, 96 case, and 32 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery G: 77 shot for 6-pdr field guns; 211 shot, 64 shell, 128 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons; 143 case and 46 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • Battery I: 288 shot, 96 shell, 288 case, and 96 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery K: 192 shot, 64 shell, 192 case, and 64 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Battery L: 300 shot, 102 shell, 280 case, and 117 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: 17 shell and 20 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Two flags to consider with this list.  Battery C didn’t have 6-pdrs at this stage of the war, having turned those in sometime in January.  But the rounds, theoretically, could be fired from their James rifles.  So those might have simply been residual ammunition left over from earlier service… or service ammunition set aside for special use with the rifles.

Battery G had no use at all for 6-pdr rounds.  And use of howitzer rounds in Napoleons would be puzzling.  So this escapes any simple conjecture.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, we consider the Hotchkiss columns:

0219_2_Snip_Ohio_1st

Two calibers in play here – 3-inch and 3.80-inch:

  • Battery A: 90 shot for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery B: 20 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 109 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 77 canister, 96 percussion shell, and 120 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; Also 121 percussion shell for 3.80-inch rifles!!!
  • Battery K: 98 canister and 643 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 56 canister, 115 percussion shell, and 40 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles; And 75 shot, 56 fuse shell, and 180 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Company F, 32nd Infantry: 107 fuse shell and 451 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

As Battery G had no use for James caliber projectiles, the quantities of that caliber on hand may have been a transcription error by the clerks.  But where to put 121 percussion shells, I don’t know.

The next page offers a mix of Hotchkiss, Dyer’s, and James projectiles.

0220_1A_Snip_Ohio_1st

Taking these in turn, first the “left over” Hotchkiss columns:

  • Battery A: 140 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery G: 148 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 94 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Here again we see Battery G with James-caliber projectiles… but no James rifles on hand.

Dyer’s projectiles:

  • Battery G: 96 shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

We don’t often see Dyer’s projectiles issued to batteries in the western theater.

James’ projectiles:

  • Battery C: 102 shot and 61 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Turning to the Shenkl columns on the next page:

0220_2_Snip_Ohio_1st

Five batteries reported quantities:

  • Battery A: 318 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery B: 240 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery C: 239 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • Battery H: 349 shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • Battery M: 278 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Two batteries reported Tatham’s canister:

  • Battery B: 180 canister for 3.80-inch.
  • Battery M: 66 canister for 3.80-inch.

Lastly we move to the small arms:

0220_3_Snip_Ohio_1st

By battery:

  • Battery A: Three Navy revolvers, two cavalry sabers, and eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery B: Twenty-three horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery C: Just eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery G: Nine Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • Battery H: Twenty Army revolvers and thirty-eight horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery I: Twelve Navy revolvers and thirty-four horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery K: Twelve Army revolvers and twelve horse artillery sabers.
  • Battery L: Nineteen Navy revolvers and thirty-four (?) foot artillery sabers.
  • Battery M: Seven Army revolvers and three (?) cavalry sabers.

Closing out the Ohio batteries, we find that at the closing date for the second quarter, 1863, all of the 1st Light Regiment were well employed.  And we must also add the fine work by Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry to that list.

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – Ohio Independent Batteries, Part 2

Picking up where we left off with the last post, we proceed through Ohio’s independent batteries for the second quarter of 1863.  Looking at the “lower half” of those:

0209_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

As mentioned last week, there were twenty-six numbered independent batteries.  Only twenty-five appear on this list.  The last, the 26th Independent Battery, was Company F, 32nd Ohio Infantry.  And we’ll see them tallied on a later page of the summaries.  For now, we have the 13th through the 25th:

 

  • 13th Battery: “Not in service.”  This battery ceased to exist, officially, in April 1862.
  • 14th Battery: Reporting, as of August, 1863, at Corinth, Mississippi with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles. However, at the end of June, the battery part of the District of Jackson (though at Lynnville, Tennessee), Thirteenth Corps.   Lieutenant Homer H. Stull was the commander “in the field” with the battery.  But Stull died in May.  Captain Jerome B. Burrows returned later in the spring.
  • 15th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 6-pdr field guns.  Captain Edward Spear, Jr. remained in command.  The battery was in Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps, and serving in the siege of the city.
  • 16th Battery: Reporting on September 25, 1863 as at Carrollton, Louisiana with one  6-pdr field gun, one 12-pdr Napoleon, and three 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain (promoted that spring) Russell P. Twist remained in command.  The battery was with Twelfth Division, Thirteenth Corps.  As such it was involved with the Vicksburg siege at the end of June 1863.
  • 17th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with six 10-pdr Parrotts. The battery was assigned to Tenth Division, Thirteenth Corps.  Captain Ambrose A. Blount remained in command through the much Vicksburg Campaign, but resigned on July 2.  Lieutenant Charles S. Rice was promoted to replace Blount.
  • 18th Battery: Reporting at Tullahoma, Tennessee with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Captain Charles Aleshire’s battery was in First Division, Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.
  • 19th Battery: As of January 1864, reporting at Knoxville, Tennessee with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  The battery remained at Lexington, Kentucky through the first weeks of June.  After which, Captain Joseph C. Shields’ battery was involved with the pursuit of Morgan.  The battery was officially in the District of Central Kentucky.   Later, in July, the battery was placed in First Division, Twenty-third Corps.
  • 20th Battery: Reporting, in June 1864, at Chattanooga, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 3-inch Ordnance rifles.  The armament is fine.  But for June 1863 the battery was involved with the Tullahoma Campaign, and thus somewhere near Hoover Gap at the end of the quarter.  The battery remained under Captain [John T.] Edward Grosskopff  and assigned to assigned to Second Division, Twentieth Corps.
  • 21st Battery: No report.  The battery remained at Camp Dennison, Ohio, presumably still with six 12-pdr Napoleons.  Captain James W. Patterson, commanding.  The battery was involved with the pursuit of Morgan in July.
  • 22nd Battery: No report.  After organizing, the battery moved briefly to Wheeling, West Virginia (to counter resistance to the draft), with only two guns.  In mid-June the battery moved back to Camp Chase, Ohio, where two more guns were assigned.  Caliber not reported.  Commanded by Captain Henry M. Niel.
  • 23rd Battery: “Not in service.” This battery was formed from the 2nd Kentucky Infantry and later became the 1st Kentucky Independent Light Battery. Only mentioned here due to “placeholder” status.
  • 24th Battery:  No report. Not mustered until August 1863.  However, the battery does appear as assigned to the Department of Ohio with Lieutenant James W. Gamble assigned command of recruits gathered at Camp Dennison.
  • 25th Battery: Reporting from Little Rock, Arkansas, in May 1864, with two 3-inch Ordnance rifles and four 3.67-inch rifles (replacing four 6-pdr smoothbores from the previous quarter).  In June 1863 the battery moved from Rolla to Pilot Knob, Missouri.  There the battery became part of the force that would advance on Little Rock in August.  Captain Julius L. Hadley was in command.

So of thirteen numbers, eight were posted to active departments.  Three were forming up.  And two were just administrative placeholders.

Turning to the smoothbore ammunition on hand:

 

0211_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Five batteries reporting:

  • 14th Battery: 148 shot, 48 shell, 150 case, and 50 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 15th Battery: 233 shot, 123 case, and 220 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 16th Battery: 46 shot, 90 case, and 26 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 61 shot, 54 shell, 106 case, and 26 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 19th Battery: 74 shot, 251 shell, 293 case, and 234 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 20th Battery: 62 shot, 41 shell, 34 case, and 34 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, first the Hotchkiss patents:

0211_2_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Five lines:

  • 14th Battery: 147(?) canister, 385 percussion shell, and 276 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 16th Battery: 190 shot and 120 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 18th Battery: 246 canister, 115 percussion shell, 694 fuse shell, and 493 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 20th Battery: 148(?) canister, 214 percussion shell, and 365 fuse shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 410 shot, 360 percussion shell, and 40 fuse shell for 3.67-inch rifles.

Notice the 25th Battery did not report Hotchkiss rounds for their 3-inch rifles.

Continuing to the next page, there are a couple of stray Hotchkiss columns and Dyer’s patent:

0212_1A_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Hotchkiss first:

  • 16th Battery: 104 Hotchkiss canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 25th Battery: 160 Hotchkiss canister for 3.67-inch rifles.

Dyers:

  • 25th Battery: 172 Dyer’s shrapnel for 3-inch rifles.

Moving over to the James columns:

0212_1B_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

Just one:

  • 16th Battery: 50 shell and 450 case for 3.80-inch rifles.

Then on to the Parrott projectiles:

0212_1C_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

A lonely entry:

  • 17th Battery: 240 canister for 10-pdr Parrotts.

This begs the question as to what Blount’s battery was firing at Vicksburg.

One line from the Schenkl columns:

0212_2_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

  • 25th Battery: 159 shell and 80 canister for 3.67-inch rifles.

The 25th had a variety of projectiles for the rifled 6-pdrs, but apparently only shrapnel for the 3-inch rifles!

Lastly the small arms:

0212_3_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt2

By battery:

  • 14th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 15th Battery: Eight cavalry sabers.
  • 16th Battery: Twenty-five Navy revolvers and twenty-two cavalry sabers.
  • 17th Battery: Nine Army revolvers.
  • 18th Battery: Thirty Army revolvers, three cavalry sabers, and thirty horse artillery sabers.
  • 19th Battery: Thirty Navy revolvers and twelve cavalry sabers.
  • 20th Battery: Twenty-five Army revolvers and twenty-nine horse artillery sabers.
  • 25th Battery: Six “Rifled muskets, foreign manufacture”, twenty-six Navy revolvers, and fourteen cavalry sabers.

From the previous quarter, the 25th Battery reported Belgian rifles.

Next we will look at the 1st Ohio Light Artillery’s batteries.

 

Summary Statement, 2nd Quarter, 1863 – Ohio Independent Batteries, Part 1

Ohio, like New York, had both a regimental system for artillery and independent batteries.  With the summaries for the second quarter of 1863, for some reason the Ordnance Department clerks opted to list the independent batteries before those of the 1st Ohio Light Artillery Regiment.  Yet another accounting anomaly to pester historians with OCD.  Looking at the summary, we find twenty-five of the twenty-six independent batteries were allocated a line:

0209_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_All

The 26th Independent Battery?  It was indeed in service at this time of the war, but under a different name.  But we’ll see them listed a little later… and then discuss their interesting story.

For part one, let us focus on the first twelve independent batteries:

0209_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

Nine of the first twelve filed returns.  Though several of those were not received by Washington until 1864.

 

  • 1st Battery: No report. Captain James R. McMullin commanded this battery, supporting the Third Division, Eighth Corps. The battery moved from Kanawha Falls, to Charleston, West Virginia near the end of June.  Sketches of the unit’s service indicate the battery had four guns at this time.  Not sure as to the type and caliber.
  • 2nd Battery: From an April 1864 return, this battery was at Ship’s Island, Mississippi with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.80-inch James rifles.  Lieutenant Augustus Beach commanded this battery assigned to Twelfth Division (later Third Division), Thirteenth Corps.  The battery participated in the Vicksburg Campaign, and was in the lines at Vicksburg at the end of June 1863.
  • 3rd Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with two 6-pdr field guns and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.   The battery was assigned to Third Division, Seventeenth Corps.  Captain William S. Williams remained in command.
  • 4th Battery:  Reported, as of October 1863, at Iuka, Mississippi, with two (or three) 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.80-inch James Rifles.   However, Captain Louis Hoffman’s battery was assigned to First Divsision, Fifteenth Corps.  And they participated in the Vicksburg Campaign with that formation.
  • 5th Battery:  No location given.  Battery reported two 6-pdr field guns, two 12-pdr field howitzers, and two 3.80-inch James Rifles.  Commanded by Lieutenant Anthony B. Burton.  The battery served in Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps through the Vicksburg Campaign.  During the siege, the battery operated a 42-pdr rifle and an 8-inch siege gun captured from the Confederates.
  • 6th  Battery:  Reporting from Hillsboro, Tennessee with two 12-pdr Napoleons and four 10-pdr Parrotts. Captain Cullen Bradley remained in command of the battery, which was assigned to First Division, Twenty-First Corps.  The battery participated in the Tullahoma Campaign.  Hillsboro is roughly half-way between Murfreesboro and Chattanooga.
  • 7th Battery: No return.  In the previous quarter, the battery reported four 3.80-inch James Rifles.  The battery was assigned to Fourth Division, Sixteenth Corps.   Captain Silas A. Burnap remained commander.  During the siege of Vicksburg, the battery guarded the rear of the Federal lines.
  • 8th Battery: Reporting in January 1864 as at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  But no guns listed.   Commanded by Captain James F. Putnam, this battery was assigned to Second Division, Fifteenth Corps.  During the siege of Vicksburg, the battery manned 30-pdr Parrotts (those not being considered “field guns” may explain the absence of guns on the summary).
  • 9th Battery: Guy’s Gap, Tennessee with four 12-pdr Napoleons and two 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. The battery was commanded by Captain Harrison B. York and assigned to the Reserve Corps, Army of the Cumberland.  The battery was among the forces arrayed to protect the Army of the Cumberland’s supply lines.
  • 10th Battery: At Vicksburg, Mississippi with four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Under Captain Hamilton B. White, the battery remained with Sixth Division, Seventeenth Corps.  For a time during the siege of Vicksburg, the battery occupied Fort Ransom. but the end of June found them protecting the Federal rear along the Big Black River.
  • 11th Battery: No report. Was part of the Seventh Division, Seventeenth Corps. On paper, Captain Frank C. Sands was commander.  But with Sands serving as division artillery chief, Lieutenant Fletcher E. Armstrong commanded. The battery through the Vicksburg Campaign though suffered heavily due to sickness.
  • 12th Battery: At Camp Barry, District of Columbia with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles. Captain Aaron C. Johnson commanded this battery.  In June, the battery was among several swapped out of the Army of the Potomac for fresh batteries.  They reported to the Artillery Camp of Instruction.

 

So we see, among these twelve batteries, a focus on Vicksburg, Mississippi.  With of course a couple employed in Tennessee, one in West Virginia, and one just missing the Gettysburg Campaign.

Moving to the ammunition, first we look at the smoothbore rounds:

0211_1_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

With 6-pdr field guns, 12-pdr field howitzers, and Napoleons on hand, this is a busy page:

  • 2nd Battery: 74 shell, 135 case, and 69 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 3rd Battery: 70 shot, 40 case, and 56 canister for 6-pdr field guns.
  • 4th Battery: 49 shell, 13 case, and 46 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 5th Battery: 4 shot, 235 case, and 155 canister for 6-pdr field guns; 155 shell, 64 case, and 69 canister for 12-pdr field howitzers.
  • 6th Battery: 48 shot, 52 shell, 76 case, and 80 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.
  • 9th Battery: 104 shot, 153 shell, 310 case, and 226 canister for 12-pdr Napoleons.

Moving to the rifled projectiles, we find a wide array of makes and calibers.  Starting with the Hotchkiss patent types:

0211_2_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

Hotchkiss for both the James and Ordnance rifles:

  • 2nd Battery: 100 fuse shell and 90 bullet shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 3rd Battery: 112 percussion shell and 113 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 4th Battery: 64 shot and 216 percussion shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 5th Battery: 79 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 9th Battery: 85 canister, 145 fuse shell, and 155 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 30 shot and 160 fuse shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 12th Battery:  492 fuse shell and 403 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

I’ll break down the next page in sections for easier handling.  Starting with the extended Hotchkiss columns and Dyer’s patent:

0212_1A_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

Hotchkiss patent:

  • 3rd Battery: 49 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 309 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

Dyer’s:

  • 12th Battery: 120 canister for 3-inch rifles.

Then moving to the James patent projectiles:

0212_1B_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

Four batteries reporting:

  • 2nd Battery: 100 shot and 400 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 3rd Battery: 15 shot and 35 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 5th Battery: 4 shot, 112 shell and 95 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 103 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.

Only one battery reported Parrott rifles:

0212_1C_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

So we find one battery reporting Parrott projectiles:

  • 6th Battery: 440 shell, 347 case, and 60 canister for 10-pdr Parrott.

But do remember 8th Battery used 30-pdr Parrotts at Vicksburg, though not listed in the summary.

Tuning to the last page, let us break the projectiles into two sections.  First the Schenkl patent:

0212_2A_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

Three lines:

  • 4th Battery: 143 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 10th Battery: 64 shell for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 12th Battery: 167 shell for 3-inch rifles.

Moving to the last columns, we have Tatham’s canister on hand with two batteries:

0212_2B_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

  • 2nd Battery: 143 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.
  • 4th Battery: 94 canister for 3.80-inch rifles.

One might expect a variety of projectiles used by the batteries at Vicksburg, given the extended supply lines.  But 12th Battery, at Camp Barry, had three different patent types of 3-inch projectiles.  And they were right in the Ordnance Department’s back yard!

Last we have the small arms:

0212_3_Snip_Ohio_IND_Pt1

By battery:

  • 2nd Battery: Eight cavalry sabers.
  • 3rd Battery: Twenty-three Navy revolvers and eight cavalry sabers.
  • 4th Battery: Twenty-five Army revolvers, fifty-two cavalry sabers, six horse artillery sabers, and sixteen foot artillery sabers.
  • 5th Battery: Seven Navy revolvers and sixteen cavalry sabers.
  • 6th Battery: Ten horse artillery sabers.
  • 9th Battery: Thirteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 10th Battery: Two Army revolvers and six cavalry sabers.
  • 12th Battery: Four cavalry sabers and twenty horse artillery sabers.

The 4th Battery demonstrated a fondness for edged weapons.

We’ll look at the second half of the Ohio independent batteries in the next installment.