Summary Statement, 1st Quarter, 1863 – Connecticut and Delaware

After a full set of pages for the US Regulars, the first quarter, 1863 summaries moved to the volunteer batteries, grouped by state.  The first of those were Connecticut and Delaware. Between those two, there were three entries on the summary for the quarter:

0100_1_Snip_CT_DE

There are some subtractions from the previous quarter’s summary which we need to address in turn.  And first of those would be to note the absence of California from the list. California did not provide units designated as batteries during the war.  The previous quarter recorded artillery stores on hand with the 3rd California Infantry.

Also in the earlier quarter, Connecticut was represented by three batteries – 1st and 2nd Light Artillery and  Battery B, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery.  The latter was not recorded for the first quarter, 1863:

  • 1st Connecticut Light Artillery Battery: Reporting at Beaufort, South Carolina with six 3.80-inch James Rifles.  The battery shed two 12-pdr howitzers reported the previous quarter. Captain Alfred P. Rockwell commanded this battery, assigned to the garrison at Beaufort, Tenth Corps, Department of the South.
  • 2nd Connecticut Light Artillery Battery: At Wolf Run Shoals, Virginia with two 12-pdr field howitzers and four 3.80-inch James Rifles. Captain  John W. Sterling commanded this battery.  It was assigned to Casey’s Division in the Defenses of Washington.

The 3rd Connecticut Light Artillery would not be formed until 1864.

Delaware’s lone entry on the summary remained:

  • 1st Delaware Light Artillery Battery: At Camp Barry, Washington, D.C. with six 3-inch Ordnance Rifles.  Note the battery dropped two howitzers off their charge and increased to a uniform battery of rifles. Captain Benjamin Nields was in command of this battery.  At the close of the quarter the battery remained at the Artillery Camp of Instruction.  But in April the battery moved to Norfolk, Virginia and became part of the Seventh Corps.  Briefly, that is, part of the Seventh Corps.

This makes for “short work” of the remaining pages.  Moving down to the smoothbore projectiles, we see one entry line, as we would expect:

0102_1_Snip_CT_DE

2nd Connecticut reported 110 shell, 158 case, and 29 canister for their pair of 12-pdr field howitzers.

On to the rifled projectiles, starting with the Hotchkiss columns:

0102_2_Snip_CT_DE

Everybody gets some Hotchkiss here:

  • 1st Connecticut: 90 percussion shell, 120 fuse shell, and 468 bullet shell of Hotchkiss-type for the 3.80-inch James rifle.  Cumbersome way of explaining this, but think – these are Hotchkiss projectiles made for James rifles.
  • 2nd Connecticut: 229 Hotchkiss bullet shell for 3.80-inch James rifles.
  • 1st Delaware:  75 canister, 40 percussion shell, 80 fuse shell, and 474 bullet shell for 3-inch rifles.

But we are not done with Hotchkiss, as we see entries in a couple of rarely used columns on the next page:

0103_1_Snip_CT_DE

I’ve posted the whole of this snip for review.  But for display here, I’ve cropped to just the Hotchkiss, Dyer, and James columns were entries are posted:

  • 1st Connecticut: 190 Hotchkiss canister for 3.80-inch James Rifle;  225 James canister 3.80-inch James rifle (redundant, but to be clear – James-type projectile for use in James rifle).
  • 2nd Connecticut: 80 Hotchkiss canister for 3.80-inch James Rifle;
  • 1st Delaware: 40 Dyer canister 3-inch rifle.

Moving over to the Schenkl columns:

0103_2_Snip_CT_DE

One entry for each battery:

  • 1st Connecticut: 978 Schenkl shell for 3.80-inch James Rifles.
  • 2nd Connecticut:  291 Schenkl shell for 3.80-inch James Rifles.
  • 1st Delaware: 86 Schenkl shell for 3-inch rifles.

That gets us to the small arms:

0103_3_Snip_CT_DE

By battery:

  • 1st Connecticut: 135 Navy revolvers, thirteen cavalry sabers, and forty-six horse artillery sabers.
  • 2nd Connecticut: Twenty Navy revolvers and sixteen horse artillery sabers.
  • 1st Delaware:  Twenty-four Army revolvers and seventy-one horse artillery sabers.

So a quick summary for the batteries from these two states.  I mentioned some of the changes in reported cannons on hand above, but did not mention variations with the reported ammunition. Unlike many of the US Regulars, the Connecticut and Delaware batteries reports differed from quarter to quarter.  Other than explaining the reduced number of entry lines, not a lot to question with these summaries.

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