150 Years Ago: Capture of the USS Isaac Smith

I’m running a bit behind again on today’s post.  Furthermore, this is another “over there” post.

One hundred and fifty years ago this afternoon, Confederates ambushed and captured the Federal gunboat USS Isaac Smith.  In observance of that event, today’s post is a cross posting over at the Civil War Navy Sesquicentennial blog.

Yes, I do have a special fondness for the Civil War activity in those low country marshes.

Artist's impression of the capture of USS Isaa...

Artist’s impression of the capture of USS Isaac Smith in the Stono River, South Carolina, 1863. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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12 responses to “150 Years Ago: Capture of the USS Isaac Smith

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  2. Richard Gillespie

    That must have been very satisfying, capturing a United States gunboat named for John Brown (a.k.a., “Isaac Smith”).

    All the Best, Rich Gillespie Director of Education Mosby Heritage Area Association Post Office Box 1497 Middleburg VA 20118 (540) 687-5578 rgillespie@mosbyheritagearea.org Visit us on the web at http://www.mosbyheritagearea.org “Preservation through Education”

    • Rich, DANFS is silent on the origin of the name. But the Isaac Smith was originally named Isaac P. Smith in commercial service. She was launched in 1853. I’ve always figured that date rules out the connection to John Brown. There were a couple of political figures who bore that name and “Isaac P. Smith, early contractor and master builder” from New Albany, Indiana.

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