Tennessee Civil War GIS Project

Fort Donelson NPS passed this along via their Twitter feed earlier this week:

Tennessee Civil War GIS Project

The map is one in a series of projects hosted by the Tennessee State Library & Archives. The map provides several display options depicting Civil War related sites, particularly battle fields, throughout Tennessee. Layers include the standard road maps and satellite views, but also add battlefields, core battlefield areas, study areas, and potential National Registry boundaries. There’s also options to show flood zones, property boundaries and land use. The layers also allow selection of forts, batteries, cemeteries, and 1865 railroads. Four “transparencies” overlay maps onto the display. These are Fort Donelson (one from 1862 and one from 1940), Fort Sanders (1874), and Franklin (1863).

The only down side I see is the inability to pull a direct link back for a specific area or layering. There’s an option to output a PDF, but it lacks many of the layers. Oh, and it is not mobile friendly. Still, it is better than they had in 1960! So why am I being so picky?

While you are at the map site, you might also check out some of the State Library & Archives other projects. The “sourcebook” offers over 7,000 artifacts from the Official Records, diaries, newspapers and other primary sources. There’s an additional set of 2,000 pamphlets from 1845-1865 in Civil War Era Database, but you need Tennessee state credentials to access. The site also provides indexes to the archival holdings, which include the Tennessee Civil War Veterans Questionnaires. Oh, and there is a nine page listing of Colored Confederate Pension Applications, which Andy Hall is probably most familiar with.

Good things from the State of Tennessee. And another example of a trend during the Sesquicentennial. There seems to be a lot of preserving (both land and artifacts) going on, but an effort to put what is preserved in full color context.

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One response to “Tennessee Civil War GIS Project

  1. I’ve used the sourcebook many times, great site.

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